Sports Gluttony: How Many Acid Attacks Are You Having?

Sports Gluttony: How Many Acid Attacks Are You Having?

We don’t often associate gluttony with sports: however, in this second article  by the Australian Dental Association about the Seven Sporting Sins (click here), we discover that this type of gluttony refers to the consumption of sports drinks, snacks and supplements containing sugar and acids in quantities and frequencies that put the teeth at risk of Acid Attack.

The article explains why acid attack is a problem, and how it can ultimately lead to tooth decay. Acid attacks can also cause erosion of the tooth enamel: the tough outer coating of the teeth that protects the teeth from damage.

‘Health Foods’ are sometimes not as healthy as we are led to believe: muesli bars, energy bars, dried fruits and sports drinks may all contain sugar- although the labelling is sometimes deceptive. Sugar can have many names…

This article finishes with recommendations about how teeth can be protected:

  • Only snack on foods that have high nutritional value and are low in sugar
  • Eat plenty of fresh produce rather than packaged foods
  • Read the label, and avoid foods with high sugar content
  • Use Google to research healthy snack ideas

Some Articles About Acid And Sugar Gluttony That You Might Enjoy

 

A screenshot of the BDJ article, "Sports Drinks Trial Finds High Levels Of Tooth Erosion"Sports Drinks Trial Finds High Levels Of Tooth Erosion

This article is about a study conducted by the University of Birmingham (click here), which looked into the erosive effects of sports drinks. Athletes are at higher risk of tooth erosion as they tend to experience dry mouths during training: this is a problem because saliva can dilute and, to a certain extent, neutralise acids in the mouth. Sports drinks have quite a high acidity level (for taste and to increase the shelf life), so when they are consumed by athletes who do not produce enough saliva to regulate the acidity of these sports drinks, tooth erosion happens.”In a trial recreating intensive exercise conditions, it was found that some sports drinks can cause up to 30 times more enamel loss than water,” according to this study.

 

A screenshot of ADA's downloadable PDF, "Eating For Healthy Teeth And Energy"Eating For Healthy Teeth And Energy

The Australian Dental Association’s Mouthguard Awareness campaign produced valuable resources such as this one (click here), a PDF guide for parents and coaches on the right food and drinks to give young athletes.

 

 

 

A screenshot of Colgate's article, "Smart Snacks For Healthy Teeth"Smart Snacks For Healthy Teeth

How do you ensure your snacks aren’t endangering your oral health? This article by Colgate (click here) gives tips on “snacking smart”—something athletes and non-athletes can learn from!

 

 

 

A screenshot of Daily Mail article, "Is Snacking Ruining Your Teeth?"Is Snacking Ruining Your Teeth?

Another article by the Daily Mail highlights the fact that some of our favourite snacks are our teeth’s biggest enemies. A great reminder for athletes and non-athletes alike: “Each time you eat or drink anything sugary, your teeth are under ‘acid attack’ for up to one hour after eating.” Read the article here.

 

 

A screen grab of NZ Herald website article, "Teeth Under Attack From 'Healthy' Snacks"Teeth Under Attack From ‘Healthy’ Snacks

Still on snacking and how it leads to acid attack, this article by NZ Herald (click here) reiterates: “Acid erosion is definitely a growing problem. This is partly due to the trend for grabbing acidic juices when on the go or snacking little and often.”

 

 

Article From Corinna Dental Group

Clean teeth.Bandits, Toddlers And Snacking

In which we learn that nearly every family has at least one ‘Sugar Bandit’

 

 

How-Much-Sugar-Infographic-small

How Much Sugar Is In Your Favourite Snack?

An infographic showing just how much sugar can be found in everyday favourites

 

Dental Resolutions: Fewer Acidic Beverages

Gives some tips about how to reduce the effect that acidic beverages have on your teeth

 

Emergency Room Visits Tied To Energy Drink Consumption

Explains that sports and energy drinks can have serious short-term effects when consumed in large quantities

 

Want To Know More?

We’re keen to encourage all Canberrans to be healthy and active! If you have any questions about acid attack, ask any member of our friendly team.

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